Bio 106 - Stark - Study suggestions

Take good notes and study them


(My suggestion of the order in which to study - only a suggestion.) Come to lecture with the outines (see below) and figures (see below). Take lots of notes. Study them the very same day: (1) Fill in blanks you may have left if you could not write fast enough. (2) Read the book and fix up your notes from the book. Evaluate for yourself what material from the book is not emphasized. By the time of the the test, your notes should look studied. Underline or highlight vocabulary and/or points you still need to learn. Use different colors or styles for different marks (additions to your notes from the book, vocabulary, etc.)

Make yourself a vocbulary list

Let's take, for instance, the first lecture (Protista):
http://starklab.slu.edu/Bio2000/Protista.htm
The following is a list of terms that you should be able to discuss after studying that lecture:
Actinopods
African sleeping sickness
Algae
Alveolata
Amoeba
Apicomplexa
Autogamy
Autotroph
Bacillariophyta
Blooms
Candidate Kingdom
Cellular Slime mold
Chlamydomonas
Chlorella
Chlorophyta
Chloroplast
Chytridiomycota
Ciliates
Ciliophorans
Conjugation
Chrysophyta
Diatoms
Dictyostelium
Didinium
Diplomonadida
Dinoflagellata
Division
Endosymbiote
Euglenozoans
Eukaryote
Foraminifera
Gametophyte
Giardia
Golden algae
Gonyaulax
Heterotroph
Kelp
Malaria
Mitochondrion
Myxomycota
Oomycota
Organelles
Parabasala
Paramecium
Phaeophyta
Phagocytosis
Pheromone
Phycobilins
Phylum
Phytoplankton
Plasmodial slime mold
Plasmodium
Plastid
Prokaryote
Protista
Protozoan
Pseudopods
Radiolarins
Helozoans
Red tides
Rhizopods
Rhodophyta
Sickle cell anemia
Spore
Sporophyte
Sporozoites
Stramenopila
Syngamy
Trypanosoma
Tsetse fly
Xanthophyll

How to use posted exams to study

It is never too early to utilize posted exams as a supplement because you should be certain that you have the information needed to understand the question and to know why the answer is correct and why the alternatives are not. Let me use Question 1 from Test #1 as an example.

1. Trypanosoma, the flagellate that causes African sleeping sickness and is spread by the tsetse fly, is most closely related to
(a) the organism that causes red tides.
(b) Rhizopus, the black bread mold.
(c) Trichinella, the parasite you might "catch" by eating undercooked pork.
(d) Euglena, the "little green fungus-like animal."
(e) Schistosoma, the blood fluke spread to humans by snails.

Now let us dissect that question:

Trypanosoma, the flagellate that causes African sleeping sickness and is spread by the tsetse fly:
You should have this coverage in the first lecture. Do you have this in your notebook? If not, you should be taking better notes. If so, did you study those points?

(a) red tides, blooms, are caused by dinoflagellates, and this was covered in the same lecture. Do you have this in your notebook? If not, you should be taking better notes. If so, did you study those points?

(b) Rhizopus, the black bread mold.
From the Fungus lecture, you should know that this is a completely different organism. Do you have this in your notebook? If not, you should be taking better notes. If so, did you study those points?

(c) Trichinella, the parasite you might "catch" by eating undercooked pork.
This is an animal. Are you clear on this? Do you have this in your notebook? If not, you should be taking better notes. If so, did you study those points?

(d) Euglena, the "little green fungus-like animal."
In the first lecture this was stated. If you really learned this point, it should be obvious that this is the answer.

(e) Schistosoma, the blood fluke spread to humans by snails.
Again, an animal. Do you have this in your notebook? If not, you should be taking better notes. If so, did you study those points?

The figures

I have gone to a lot of trouble to indicate the figures I will be showing. These figures are really full of information. One study suggestion would be to make a nice, neat copy before lecture (trim off all but the figure) and take notes about what is being said about the figures right on the copy in your note book.

Using the outlines

Remember that the outlines are just that, outlines. They are far short of notes you should be taking. You can make a copy of the outline before lecture so that you can save yourself the trouble of rewriting what I wrote. Make sure you have enough clear paper to write notes. If you have a 3-ring binder, print out the outlines one-sided a few lectures ahead and punch holes and put them in the notebook. If you punch on the right side of the page, you will have the back side of the next page clear to supplement the outline you will see to your left. If you have a laptop, you can have the lecture on your laptop and add your notes into the outline neatly (if you are good at typing under lecture circumstances; you might still want a paper notebook for drawing diagrams.

This page was last updated 12/31/02

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